Features

Internship Panel

by Taylor Morrow–

On March 18, 2015 an Internship panel was held in the Bowman Library during Tea & Conversation in the Library. This panel was comprised of students with different majors and interests and even included an alumnus. Different questions were answered in order to inform Menlo students of what to expect before, during, and after an internship. Since Menlo College business students are required to complete an internship in order to graduate, it is helpful to receive the inside scoop from those who have already gone through the process.

Internship panel

Internship panel in progress (photo by Andrey Poliakov)

Ashley Delgadillo

  1. Where was your internship?

I was an Intern for Foundation for a College Education (FCE) in East Palo Alto. FCE is a program that helps students of color graduate high school and college.

 

  1. How did you find your internship?

Who you know really does matter! I got my internship through Angela Schmiede who knew the Executive Director of FCE because they went to Stanford together.

 

  1. What was your interview process like?

I didn’t have an interview, I just got the job! I got the job through my Menlo connections.

 

  1. Did you always have clear tasks that were your own responsibility? Or did you have to come up with ways to develop projects?

Ultimately I was brought into the offices to do a program evaluation of the organization. I was expected to interpret surveys, conduct focus groups, and then analyze the information into a data analysis report. So while that was clear, I was given freedom to organize and create the information as I saw fit.

 

  1. How have you kept up with your employer since leaving your internship and what is your new role?

I was offered a chance to become a part of their Internship Committee as an advisor which I accepted. I was asked to meet monthly with FCE to give them advice as to what personally worked in my internship and what didn’t.

 

  1. What was your relationship like with your supervisor and how did you communicate with them?

My supervisor was great. He guided me when I needed help and let me be on my own at the same time. I never felt intimidated to approach him so if I had a question I could just step into his office at anytime and he’d be happy to help.

 

  1. What was the best experience you had as an intern?

I really loved working with the students in the focus groups. It gave me some experience with leading discussions in groups.

  1. What was the worst?

I wish the internship could have been a bit more interactive. A lot of the time I was in a chair, at a desk, typing the report. I would have liked to have more variety of jobs at the internship.

Jolise Limcaco

  1. Where was your internship?

Frank Rimmerman Co. + LLP

  1. How did you find it?

I heard about Frank Rimmerman through my accounting professors. And two of last years accounting students intern at the same firm.

  1. What was your interview process like?

I had to go through two interviews. The first interview was about an hour and I had the opportunity to talk to the recruiter and it was a very friendly conversational interview. After that interview, I was asked to come in again and it was a half a day interview. I got the opportunity to talk to associates, senior associates, and a partner.

  1. How did you prepare?

I prepared for the interview through the school. I went to the workshops and I had a mock interview before my real one. It really taught me how to present myself and what to prepare before going into the interview.

  1. Did you know going in that there might be a job offer? Did you feel you had control over that outcome?

Yes, I did know going into my internship that there is a job offer at the end. I was fortunate to know two other accounting students who went through the same internship and was offered a full time job at the end of it. I knew that I was in control over the outcome. I tried my very best every day at work and I attended all the “optional” events, which was great advice from my professors. I knew how I presented myself throughout the internship was the determining factor if I get a job offer or not.

  1. What was your relationship like with your supervisor and how did you communicate with them?

I had constant communication with my supervisor throughout the whole day. My supervisor was the one who had a planned schedule for each day, who I was working with and what I was working on. Even though our desks were fairly far away from each other, we would email throughout the day if I had any questions. Email was the best line of communication in the office.

Vicky Schultz

  1. Where was your internship?

E2open, in Foster City CA

  1. How did you find it?

Through a family connection

 

  1. What was your interview process like?

I interviewed with 5 different people – and I was terrified! I kept thinking of stories where an executive pretends to be a member of the staff (for example, the receptionist) and has that as part of the interview. However, everyone was extremely friendly and welcoming. Though it was intimidating being in the room with so many different leaders I just kept in mind that they are only human, like me, and to stay natural.

  1. How did you prepare?

I researched the company, as well as the leading executives. I also brought a notepad with some questions that I had for them. They really liked that as it showed that I was invested and that I had put in some extra time beforehand.

  1. What do you do if you have multiple offers?

There are three things I would consider if I had multiple offers. First and foremost: the environment. What are the people like? What kind of atmosphere? You will be spending every day with your co-workers 9-5, if not more, so you have to be sure you feel comfortable in the environment. Second, salary and benefits. Both important things to consider for the long term. Finally, growth opportunities – would you be able to move up within the company? Will what you learn add value for your future jobs?

  1. Did you know going in that there might be a job offer? Did you feel you had control over that outcome?

Going into the experience I was not expecting a job offer, but of course it is something I was working towards. However, my initial internship was a rotation between 4 different departments, so I saw it more as an opportunity to help me decide what job I would want to do in the future. I feel that any intern should go into an internship with the intention of securing a job or, at the least a solid referral to a job. I believe 100% that you only get out of it as much as you put into it. Ultimately, there might be things outside of your control that may impact your ability to secure a job, however, you should do what you can to set yourself up for success.

  1. What are some ways you strengthened you position to help yourself get that job at the end of the internship?

Consistency is key. Being able to meet deadlines and complete projects are, of course, first and foremost. But additionally, being as open as possible was very important in my experience. Not being afraid to ask questions or mess up–those things will help you grow and show that you are motivated.

  1. What was your relationship like with your supervisor and how did you communicate with them?

My supervisor and I got along very well. There was a mutual level of respect and I felt comfortable approaching her with any questions/issues I had. She really was (and continues to be) a great mentor. She is also a goofball, so that helped! We communicated through email or chat, but primarily through regular team meetings and one-on-one meetings. Real face-time is definitely preferred.

  1. What was the best experience you had as an intern?

The people. It is as simple as that. I have now been with the company for 3 years and have seen a handful of employees come and go and am lucky to have built a great network. Everyone is always extremely friendly and open to help–even the executives are approachable!

Second, I was able to see the company go public (as an intern) and then, very recently, get acquired and go private. Not many people get to experience all that, and it’s been a truly educational and exciting experience.

  1. What was the worst?

During my internship there really was not a bad experience that stands out–there was no such thing. Some projects were more challenging than others and sometimes I needed help, but that was never a bad thing.